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Jim Myers - Owner

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Direct Link To This Post Topic: How To Replace Pontoon Boat Carpet
    Posted: 09/29/2005 at 7:19pm

Originally posted by Rich Rich wrote:

I would like to have the carpet replaced on my 1994 Suncruiser Pontoon Boat.  Everything looks new except for the carpet.  If anyone knows anyone in NY,PA,NJ,DE,CTor MD.  Please let me know.

Thanks Rich

Hi Rich

Welcome to our board.  A project like this can really be done by any local handy man, you don"t need to pay the marina shop rates to have the carpet replaced.  What I"d recommend is buying the carpet and adhesive yourself, of course we"d prefer you buy it from us but either way buy the material yourself and we can ship it directly to the guy/girl who"ll replace it. 

You"ve brought up a great topic, alot of our customers have their carpet replaced for them.  I"m going to change the name of this topic to How To Replace Pontoon Boat Carpet and then I"ll post a bunch of messages from our old message board, they"ll go through the replacement process. 

Thanks Rich



Edited by Wildcat Dude
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09/29/2005 at 9:33pm
Okay, since I haven"t finished the promised "Redeck Revolution" a guide to restoring pontoon boats, I thought it was important for me to get a few of the main points written down in our forum. 
 
To properly lay or install you new pontoon boat carpet (marine carpet) you are going to want to make sure you"ve either installed new CCA treated marine plywood for your deck or successfully cleaned up the existing pontoon boat decking.  Before we get to much further I want to focus on re-using your existing pontoon flooring.  Once you have completely removed all the pontoon seating, railing and other pontoon parts from the deck you"ll get the "opportunity" to remove the old carpet.  Half of the time it is going to be very easy as the old pontoon carpet will just come right up.  However if you have difficulty removing the existing marine carpet from the marine plywood you may just want to replace the deck right there, simply use a razor knife and cut the carpet at the deck joints (where the two sheets of plywood meet) and tear off the plywood and replace it with new. 
 
I"m going to stop right there and give you a list of things to look for before you even begin to remove the carpet, if the deck is bad there is no since in spending time removing the carpet.  You want to walk the deck and pay special attention to any weak spots on the deck, jump around a bit, if you fall through the floor you need to redeck it, ha!  Seriously though, spend time accessing the joints where two sheets of plywood come together....are they warped?  Does the side of the plywood (the plys that were covered with the deck trim (the aluminum channel that fits over the edge of the decking and runs the length of the pontoon) look delaminated or do you see signs of rotting?  You might want to get under the boat and look around with a flash light as well, you"ll be able to see major bad spots.
 
If you scope out the deck for 10 minutes and think it is in good enough shape that you might not need to replace it then begin removing the carpet by simply trying to pull it up by a corner.  Cutting it into strips across the deck and pulling up the strips at a time works well too.
 
If you are able to remove the existing pontoon carpet you want to make sure that you remove ALL of the adhesive and bits of old rubber backing (left over from the carpet) from the pontoon deck.  If you leave clumps of old glue and carpet backing on the deck you"ll end up with lumps in your carpet and even worse, it will most likely react with the new non-toxic marine adhesive causing your new pontoon carpet to lose adhesion.  Once you tear off the carpet take some sort of scraper and clean off the deck, if you are in the north an ice scraper works wonders (most of our southern customers don"t have one lying around in the garage but you can find some sort of scraping device that will work fine) 
 
Once the carpet it is removed you can make the final decision as to replacing the pontoon boats decking.  You might find that you only need to replace a sheet or two, more than likely though you"ll be better off just replacing the entire deck though.  It would be a real pain if you only replace 2 sheets and in a year or so the other all go bad on you. 
 
Okay so you"ve made the decision, either to redeck it or use the existing plywood.  We"ll discuss just the carpeting job at the moment, you"ll want to make sure the plywood is brushed off and clean.  Make sure you don"t have dirt or any other type of "stuff" on the deck, sweep it off good so you can apply the marine glue. 
 
Get your carpet ready...1-2-3 Go.  Take the roll of carpet and lay it out across the entire deck, unroll it so it covers the pontoon boats deck completely and then square it up at the edges.  This is the tricky part, it seems to be human nature to make things as difficult as possible when you are doing manual type labor   You do not want to re-roll the carpet and apply the glue in 4" x 8" sections, this requires you to get up on the deck, crawl around and 9 times out of 10 if you lay the adhesive and carpet this way you"ll get done and find the carpet is not on square but rather crooked and you"ll get the "opportunity" to frantically try to straighten it out before the glue adheres.  HERE IS WHAT YOU WANT TO DO:
Roll the carpet out completely like we talked about above and fold it in half running the length of the deck.  For example, if you have a 24" pontoon boat deck, get in the front of the pontoon and fold the carpet over width wise and do the same in the back, this will give you a 4" wide by 24" section of the deck which is exposed.  The carpet will be folded on top of itself on the other side of the deck.  (does that make sense, if not email me).  By folding the carpet in half the length of the deck you"ll be able to stand on the side of the pontoon boat and spread the marine adhesive while standing up, it"s very easy.  You"ll want to use our free trowel (if you order the carpet and glue from us) and empty a gallon and a half on the 4" x 24" section of deck (a 24" deck will need 3 gallons of our glue).  Spread the marine glue on in a circular pattern, just like laying tile (if you"ve ever put tile down).  By troweling the glue on in a circular motion you"ll create "lines" of glue on the deck, these lines will then be compressed into the lines on the back of the marine carpet when you are done.  Apply the glue all over the exposed section of the deck and then flip the carpet over and do the exact same thing to the other side.  Once you are completed with applying glue to the entire deck in this manner lay the carpet back over the entire deck.  You will now want to use some sort of heavy roller, a carpet roller, a heavy pipe or even a yard roller to compress the lines of glue into the back of the carpet.  If you do not do this step the carpet and glue will not adhere properly and you"ll get bubbles, lines and other spots where the carpet will come up.  That"s about it, you can get the carpet and glue down in approx. an hour or so.  Then let the carpet and glue set up for 8-12 hours.  If you can let it set a day that would be best.  You don"t want to start putting the railing and deck trim on until the carpet has had time to adhere.
 
I"ll get more done a bit later.  Thank you everyone for being a part of our business and our board.
 
Jim
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01/31/2007 at 6:32pm

Hi Strongman

16" is all you will need, unless you need to recover some other areas besides the deck like a sundeck pad or engine cover.  Thank you for joining our board!

 

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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02/08/2007 at 9:34am

Originally posted by Jennie Jennie wrote:

have a question about deck carpet. The deck we want to recover has been painted, twice. We have power washed and wire brushed the deck and most of the old loose paint has been removed. Now the question.... We want to put carpet down over this wood deck, for it gets very hot here in FL. Now the marine place told us that you can't put carpet glue down over paint, it won't stick. I did notice that the places that had glue were none wood.

  So, can we repaint, to protect the wood, then lay carpet using staples and screws and no glue?

   Thank you, Jennie

Yes you can, but the carpet won"t look as nice as if you had used glue. Depending on the furniture lay-out that you are going to use, the furniture will help keep the carpet from getting wavy from the foot traffic.



Edited by Wildcat Dude
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05/02/2007 at 9:15am

Originally posted by Herbertk Herbertk wrote:

I am thinking of purchasing an older pontoon boat.  It is kept in the water at our local marina under a covered slip.  I know I would like to change the carpet (and I will inspect the decking too) but does this project require you to take the boat out of the water?  Or can you replace the carpet while still in the slip?

Hi Herbertk

Unfortunately you will need to take the boat out of the water.  I don"t think you could easily replace the carpet otherwise.

Thanks



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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05/08/2007 at 8:11pm

Hi Dennis

You shouldn"t have to do anything to your aluminum deck.  Just make sure it is cleaned off and smooth, you could scuff it up a bit if the deck is too smooth.  This would ensure the new glue would still well, other than that there is nothing you need to do different.

Also we do sell the fence risers you can find them here:

Pontoon Boat Fence Risers

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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05/15/2007 at 8:13pm

Originally posted by damian12 damian12 wrote:

I would really like to avoid having to sand all the old glue off the old deck when I replace the carpeting.  I have been told, as long as there are no lumps, that I can glue new carpetting down over the old.  The tutorial on this site says I need to remove all the old glue.  Does anyone have a though on this

Hi damian12

We stress removing the old adhesive to prevent any problems with the old glue reacting with the new adhesive. 



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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09/10/2007 at 10:12pm

Hi Ny2ia

You can use indoor outdoor carpeting but it will not hold up nearly as well as marine carpeting.  Marine carpet has superior UV protection and the materials used are of a higher quality.  Indoor Outdoor carpet tends to deteriorate after a few years out on a deck unprotected, the backing will desintegrate.  In your case however, it may just be the easiest fix since you can buy it by the foot at a local hardware store and since it most likely won"t be a perfect match anyway it would be a less expensive alternative. 

However, if you need to replace the entire deck I would highly recommend using marine carpeting.  Thanks

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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03/16/2008 at 12:42am

Vinyl for the flooring? Wouldn"t last very long if it isn"t marine grade, but there"s already been several long discussions about it. Here"s a list of topics where that"s been discussed. Maybe you"ll get an idea what you"re up against and find the exact answer you"re looking for here http://www.pontoonstuff.com/forum/search.asp?KW=vinyl+floor& amp;SM=1&SI=PT&FM=0&OB=1   If I misread your question, I apologize.

Welcome Horse (Mr. Brett) to PontoonStuff.com forums and we appreciate you joining our little forum"s. Be sure to edit your signature (like most of our members) to include information about your boat so if you ask any questions regarding it, everyone will have an idea what you have.

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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04/22/2008 at 11:49pm

Hi Gene

In all honesty I"d never stretch the carpet, the backing is way to delicate for that.  Staples are not a bad idea though, just to hold it to the edge when you put the side trim back on.  Stay clear of the stretcher though, that might work on some types of marine carpeting but on the majority of the rubber back pontoon carpet if you stretch it too much you"ll rip the backing apart.  Once the carpet is down a heavy roller should be used to compress the glue and that"ll help work any wrinkles out.

Glad to have you on board!

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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04/23/2008 at 1:18am
Gene if you"re picking up your carpet this Saturday, I might just get to see you as I"ll be there too.
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04/23/2008 at 7:30am
Gene, I glued and rolled mine and have had great results so far.  Put down plenty of glue and roll it with a heavy roller and you"ll be well pleased.  Good luck!!

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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04/29/2008 at 11:49am

We didn"t stretch ours at all either. We laid it out and made sure it looked good and straight, clamped one side to hole it in place, peeld back half, glued rolled and then removed the clamps and did the other half. It was really pretty fast and easy. I did not use staples. so far so good but perhaps I should have, time will tell. I DID make sure we had glue all the way to the edges though.

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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05/07/2008 at 10:49am
When we did it we globbed it on (technical term there) and then wiped it off with ridged side of the trowel leaving the ribs of glue showing. There was a little left on the decking in between but not much. The idea is the ridges spread and fill in between. If you use the trowel that come with the glue and spread it with the ridged side you will be fine. Be sure to spread it all the way to the edges too. Good luck and take some pictures!
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05/17/2008 at 12:56pm

Ahoy SandyM,

         A word of caution, Using Bleach on the carpet can cause it to dry rot, and dying the carpet will also have the same affect on the fibers after sitting in the sun, I would suggest rent a carpet cleaning machine, Use a conditioning soap for carpet"s that will waterproof the fibers as well as add a UV block. Try This

http://www.meguiars.com/?cloth-carpet-cleaners/Quik-Out-Carp et-Upholstery-Cleaner

Also sc-uvsb-22.jpg UV SunBlock for Fabrics - 22oz
$11.99
UV SunBlock for Fabrics The UV SunBlock protects fabrics, fibers and colored surfaces from the fading and damage caused by the Sun's rays. This unique formula absorbs the Sun's energy of UV radiation, and then releases it in a harmless form. Fabrics and other fibers keep their resiliency and colors remain vibrant. The UV SunBlock is safe to use on all types of materials including synthetics and will not change the texture of the fabric. UV Block works well with any mill treatment by adding an extra level of protection and is fast drying.

Hope this helps

Happy Pontooning......................Mike



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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09/19/2008 at 10:05am
I"m no expert, but I"ve seen results of what that does and it can get pretty bad. Bolts will be rusted tight, so will all the rest of the hardware. Plywood will by then (depending on a lot of factors) start having a bubbling effect or worse. I wouldn"t want that stuff eating away on a boat that"s already got some age on it, and who knows what kind of TLC it got if any.
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